examples of exploratory descriptive and explanatory research questions


Descriptive research can tell that 20% of the students are failed in the exam. The difference between exploratory and descriptive research can be drawn clearly on the following grounds: Research conducted for formulating a problem for more clear investigation is called exploratory research.

The main difference between exploratory and descriptive research is that the first does not follow standardized methods but the second does. Some exploratory research examples are listed below: 1. Explanatory research is an attempt to find the question of why?

Mostly the research starts from exploratory research, then descriptive research and then explanatory research. Exploratory research will answer the basic questions related to who, where, what when, why and how if descriptive research but then descriptive research will answer the final questions related to the market. Explanatory research is an attempt to find the question of why?

This helps the author of the podcast create curated content that will gain a larger audience. Descriptive research can tell that 20% of the students are failed in the exam. Some of the popular methods of explanatory research design include: Focus Group Research; In-depth study of every single problem; Case Analysis Research; Literature Research; 1. Exploratory research design does not aim to provide the final and conclusive answers to the research questions, but merely explores the research topic with varying levels of depth. Exploratory research studies have three main purposes: To fulfill the researcher’s curiosity and need for greater understanding.
Provide examples of exploratory, descriptive and explanatory research Explain how exploratory research can often lead to more explanatory research To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member. Exploratory research design does not aim to provide the final and conclusive answers to the research questions, but merely explores the research topic with varying levels of depth. Describe how research questions for exploratory, descriptive, and explanatory quantitative questions differ and how to phrase them; Identify the differences between and provide examples of strong and weak explanatory research questions Causal research, also known as explanatory research is conducted in order to identify the extent and nature of cause-and-effect relationships. It has been noted that “exploratory research is the initial research, which forms the basis of more conclusive research.

Exploratory questions usually talk about relationships between complex data groups (multidimensional) out of which the more relevant concrete elements are yet unknown. To build up the techniques to be utilized as a part of any after research ventures. Although exploratory studies aren’t meant to offer exact estimates of the prevalence of a problem or to test specific theories, they can be very helpful in mapping domains of study. Exploratory research can come in two big forms: either a new topic or a new angle. Another example of exploratory research is a podcast survey template that can be used to collect feedback about the podcast consumption metrics both from existing listeners as well as other podcast listeners that are currently not subscribed to this channel. Mostly the research starts from exploratory research, then descriptive research and then explanatory research. Explanatory Research and Descriptive Research

Causal research can be conducted in order to assess impacts of specific changes on existing norms, various processes etc.


An example of explanatory research is a study that is trying to determine whether a variable, circumstances or chance is the cause of dangerous drinking behavior in college. Exploratory research studies have three main purposes: To fulfill the researcher’s curiosity and need for greater understanding. Examples of Exploratory Research Design.

Most often, exploratory research lays the initial groundwork for future research. Role: aimed at getting to understand the role that a certain group of known factors has over the behavior of our system or part of it (responses) that is also already known. In the online survey world, mastery of all three can lead to sounder insights and greater quality information. Research that explore and explains an individual, group or a situation, is called descriptive research.

What are the examples of explanatory research? Focus Groups: It is a method of the advanced level; here you have to gather from 8 up to 12 people who have to know at least some information about it.